Afro State of Mind Giveaway

Afro State of Mind

While enjoying the colorful happenings at African Festival at the Commedore Barry Park in Brooklyn, I saw this striking Afro passing by. As a passionate natural hair advocate I immediately approached Lurie to ask her if I could take her picture. Luckily the answer was yes.

 

Lurie Daniel Favors

While enjoying the colorful happenings at African Festival at the Commedore Barry Park in Brooklyn, I saw this striking Afro passing by. As a passionate natural hair advocate I immediately approached Lurie to ask her if I could take her picture. Luckily the answer was yes.

Three years later In 2008, her photo was not only a favorite at My 1st Natural Hair Exhibition, the beautiful dense fro also sparked so much discussion online and through social media that it inspired Lurie Daniel Favors, Attorney at Law, to write this incredible book: Afro State of Mind.

It is a book I whole hardheartedly recommend to any woman in the Diaspora, natural or not because it is an incredible read. Miss Daniel Favors just found the exact words to describe the processes we ALL go through with our natural tresses in a world that has no clue about Black Hair.

I am so humbled that my photo was the inspiration for this book and at the same time my head explodes with pride because I can hardly imagine that picturing her beautiful fro could bring out such a great author.

So I giveaway a free copy if you can motivate why you want this free signed copy. Please leave your comments in either of the sections below.  

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AfrostateofmindAfro State of Mind: Memories of a Nappy Headed Black Girl is both a memoir and coming of age story about a Black girl fighting to find her place in a world where her hair and skin color simply do not fit the norm.

Lurie is a young woman wrestling with the “problem” of “bad” hair. She knows that the predominant standard of beauty has explicitly and intentionally excluded Black women with hair like hers – and at first she buys into that way of thinking. After coming to grips with the reality that she doesn’t have “good” hair, Lurie begins the process of learning to love the hair she has and by extension learns to love herself and her community. In the decades after slavery, many women of African descent like Lurie tried to squeeze, manipulate and contort their bodies in an attempt to fit into a beauty model that was never designed for them. Lurie realizes this battle is strongest when it comes to Black hair and colorism. She spends years studying the history of nappiness (or “bad” hair), prevailing concepts of beauty and how those concepts impact the self-esteem of women of color both in the United States and abroad. Lurie uses this book to challenge some of those belief systems and to encourage Black women and the broader community to embrace and value Black women just as they are without the need for alteration: natural, beautiful and exactly the way God intended.

More about Lurie: http://www.afrostateofmind.com

 If you like to know who the winner of this contest is go to And the Winner is

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